Past Events

May 2, 2015
8:00 AM - 8:00 PM
A public reading of Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s Guantánamo Diary
We invite you to join us in an unprecedented event: on Saturday, May 2nd there will be a public reading at Northwestern University of Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s Guantánamo Diary. Although never charged with a crime, Slahi has been imprisoned for more than thirteen years in the American facility in Cuba and frequently subjected to “special interrogation techniques” that have included the full repertoire of tortures. Slahi’s Guantánamo Diary has been called a “vision of hell beyond Orwell, beyond Kafka” and at the same time, a powerful expression of—and summons to—“enduring faith in our common humanity.” We strongly believe all of us at Northwestern must attend to this book carefully in order to better understand what has happened in and to United States and the world over the past several decades, and what continues to happen. The future of our democracy depends on it. The reading will take place in The Graduate School Commons at Seabury, on Sheridan, beginning at 8:00 in the morning. We invite you to take one of the 15-minute time slots and read from the text. Please use this sign up link to let us know as soon as possible whether you will be able to join us. The event is Co-sponsored by the Department of Religious Studies, the Department of Political Science, the Buffett Institute, the Center for Legal Studies, the Department of Anthropology, the International Studies Program, the Program in American Studies, and the Program in Middle East and North African Studies.  
April 30, 2015
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
A Holistic Approach to Development and Peace Building: the Sarvodaya movement in Sri Lanka
Dr. Vinya Ariyaratne is Gen. Secretary of the Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement, Sri Lanka’s largest non-governmental grassroots development organization. He developed many innovative programs, including delivering services for internally displaced persons and a novel program to address the psycho-social effects amongst children affected by war using a community based, non-medicalized approach to healing, that helped thousands of children to recover from the trauma of war. After the Tsunami disaster in 2004, he was responsible for the overall coordination of the Sarvodaya’s emergency response and later the entire reconstruction program, one of the largest Tsunami recovery programs in the country. Dr. Ariyaratne has also been a founding member and the Coordinator of the People’s Health Movement Sri Lanka, a network of grassroots health organizations working on advocacy related to health rights, including rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS, commercial sex workers, national drug policy, anti-tobacco policy and other contemporary health issues. He has also been involved extensively in civil society peace, interfaith and reconciliation initiatives. He has extensive experience working with governmental bodies, UN agencies, multilateral agencies such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, national and international non-governmental organizations as well as the private sector in matters related to development. A past President of the College of Community Physicians of Sri Lanka, he has extensive teaching and research experience in Community Medicine and has contributed to numerous peer reviewed publications and books. He is a Board Certified Specialist in Community Medicine. Co-sponsored by Religious Studies, International Program Development (IPD), and Equality Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS)
April 29, 2015
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
"Filipino Crusaders for the Family Rosary: A History of Localization"
Northwestern series on Prayer "Filipino Crusaders for the Family Rosary: A History of Localization" Lecture by Deirde de la Cruz, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, Department of History, University of Michigan An American apostolate born out of the Catholic Cold War, the Family Rosary Crusade was one of the first organizations of its kind to recognize and self-consciously deploy various media—including rallies, film, and television—as tools for the worldwide propagation of devotion to the Virgin Mary through rosary prayer. But what would happen when the “Crusades” took root and developed elsewhere? This talk will examine the history of the Rosary Crusades in the Philippines from the 1950s through the 1980s, paying particular attention to how Filipinos took up the mantle of mission, transforming Filipino Marian devotion and mass mediated religious culture in the islands.
April 23, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Religion, Law and Politics Speaker Series - Noah Salomon
Title: When the State is Everywhere:  Rethinking the Islamic Public Sphere Department of Political Science EDGS 2014-15 Speaker Series Organizer: Elizabeth Shakman HurdSponsor: Equality, Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) ProgramCo-sponsors: Department of Political Science, Department of Religious Studies, Graduate Student Workshop in Religion & Global Politics Location: Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies, 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208Time: 12:00pm-1:30pm/lunch included Description:The series will bring together seven distinguished scholars with Northwestern faculty, graduate and undergraduate students interested in the interaction of law, religion, culture and politics in social, historical, political and legal contexts. Serving as a forum for reflection on theoretical, methodological, and critical issues in law and society, religion and diversity, and culture and politics in the US and globally, the series will traverse disciplinary boundaries to explore these questions drawing on insights from political science, law, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. The series will complement and contribute to discussions, teaching, and institution building in this field at Northwestern, including the Religion & Global Politics Certificate Program, Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Robert Orsi’s graduate seminar “Religion and Modernity” (Winter 2015), and the Graduate Student Workshop on Religion & Global Politics led by Mona Oraby and Ariel Schwartz. Professor Alessandro Ferrari will be visiting Northwestern in fall 2014 as the Roberta Buffett Visiting Professor of International Studies, and Professor Vanja Savic will be in residence in the fall and winter quarters, also affiliated with BCICS.
April 22, 2015
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
"Theology and the End of Doctrine"
April 9, 2015
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
"A Political Theology of Climate Change."
Lecture by Professor Michael S. Northcott,  University of Edinburgh Professor Northcott will discuss nations as key agents in the climate crisis, arguing that nations have legal and moral responsibilities to rule over limited terrains and to guard a just and fair distribution of the fruits of the earth within the ecological limits of those terrains. About Northcott's work, sociologist/philosopher Bruno Latour of the Paris Institute of Political Studies writes: "Michael Northcott continues to bring alive the most implausible hybrid -- a carbon theology! By reawakening the dormant meaning of Incarnation, he provides new energy for an ecological movement that could learn to thrive on the long tradition of political theology." Michael Northcott is Professor of Ethics in the School of Divinity in the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. Dr. Northcott serves as Principal Investigator of the AHRC/ESRC large grant project entitled 'Caring for the Future through Ancestral Time: Engaging the Cultural and Spiritual Presence of the Past to Promote a Sustainable Future.' He has published numerous books and papers in environmental theology and theological ethics including Place, Ecology and the Sacred (Bloomsbury 2015), A Political Theology of Climate Change (Eerdmans, 2013), with Peter Scott, Systematic Theology and Climate Change (Routledge 2014), and A Moral Climate: The Ethics of Global Warming (Orbis 2007).
February 25, 2015
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
"With him my soul was ravished": Prayer & Intimacy in Modern French Catholicism & Study of Religion
Northwestern series on Prayers: "With him my soul was ravished":Prayer and Intimacy in Modern French Catholicism and the Study of Religion Lecture by Brenna MooreAssociate Professor, Department of TheologyAssociate Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Rose Hill CampusFordham University  
February 24, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
EDGS Research Talk: Imagining the Public in Modern India: Liberalism, Law, Religion
Brannon Ingram is Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Northwestern University. Broadly, his research examines debates about Sufism, religious authority and Muslim public life in in modern South Asia and South Africa. His peer-reviewed articles are published or forthcoming from The Muslim World, Modern Asian Studies, Critical Research on Religion, and South Asia: The Journal of South Asian Studies. In May 2014, he convened an interdisciplinary conference here at Northwestern titled, "Imagining the Public in Colonial India," with support from the Buffett Center's Equality, Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) grant. The conference is the basis for a forthcoming special issue of the journal South Asia in September 2015. The paper he will be giving is a co-authored introduction to that special issue, titled "Imagining the Public in Modern India: Liberalism, Law, Religion."
February 19, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Religion, Law and Politics Speaker Series - Benjamin L. Berger
Title: “Law's Religion: Religious Difference adn the Conceits of Constitutionalism” Department of Political Science EDGS 2014-15 Speaker Series Organizer: Elizabeth Shakman HurdSponsor: Equality, Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) ProgramCo-sponsors: Department of Political Science, Department of Religious Studies, Graduate Student Workshop in Religion & Global Politics Location: Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies, 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208Time: 12:00pm-1:30pm/lunch included Description:The series will bring together seven distinguished scholars with Northwestern faculty, graduate and undergraduate students interested in the interaction of law, religion, culture and politics in social, historical, political and legal contexts. Serving as a forum for reflection on theoretical, methodological, and critical issues in law and society, religion and diversity, and culture and politics in the US and globally, the series will traverse disciplinary boundaries to explore these questions drawing on insights from political science, law, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. The series will complement and contribute to discussions, teaching, and institution building in this field at Northwestern, including the Religion & Global Politics Certificate Program, Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Robert Orsi’s graduate seminar “Religion and Modernity” (Winter 2015), and the Graduate Student Workshop on Religion & Global Politics led by Mona Oraby and Ariel Schwartz. Professor Alessandro Ferrari will be visiting Northwestern in fall 2014 as the Roberta Buffett Visiting Professor of International Studies, and Professor Vanja Savic will be in residence in the fall and winter quarters, also affiliated with BCICS.
February 18, 2015
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Finnish Eastern Orthodox Women and the Virgin Mary
"Finnish Eastern Orthodox Women and the Virgin Mary" by Elina Vuola, Academy Professor, Faculty of Theology, University of Helsinki The Orthodox Church is an important minority church in largely Lutheran Finland. Virgin Mary is central in the tradition. Based on interviews with Finnish Orthodox women, including some Skolt Sami - a small indigenous minority in Northeastern Lapland, Orthodox by religion - on their relationship with the Mother of God, issues  regarding gender and minority identity, ethnicity, and embodiment are highlighted. What is the meaning of the Virgin Mary and how is it related to women´s status and self-understanding in the Orthodox Church? How do contemporary Orthodox women perceive and interpret their identities in relation to their religious tradition but also to the secular Finnish society?
January 22, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Religion, Law & Politics Speaker Series - Ruth Marshall
Ruth Marshall, Associate Professor, University of Toronto Title: “Global Spiritual Warfare: The Politics of Evangelism in the Global South”Ruth Marshall is Associate Professor in the Departments of Political Science and Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Political Spiritualities: The Pentecostal Revolution in Nigeria (U. Chicago Press, 2009) and numerous scholarly articles on the political implications of Pentecostalism and postcolonial politics in West Africa. She’s interested in the contemporary nexus between religion and politics and the challenge of clearing an analytical space in which the political productivity of religious discourse and practice may be analyzed non-reductively. She is currently undertaking two major research projects, one funded by the SSRC, investigating prayer as a form of political praxis, and the other studying the political implications of the evangelization of Europe and North America by Pentecostals from the Global South. In 2013-14 she was a Chancellor Jackman Fellow in the Humanities at the U of Toronto’s Jackman Humanities Institute where she began work on a new book which examines the renewed ethico-political force of religious language in the public sphere and the political challenge that global revivalism poses to democratic forms of life, while exploring the possibilities and limits of a post-secular politics of translation for articulating a new relationship between the religious and the political. Lunch Included
January 20, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Religion, Law and Politics Speaker Series - Vanja-Ivan Savic
Title: “After the Age of Communism: Religious Life, Law, and National Identity in East and Central Europe” Department of Political Science EDGS 2014-15 Speaker Series Organizer: Elizabeth Shakman HurdSponsor: Equality, Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) ProgramCo-sponsors: Department of Political Science, Department of Religious Studies, Graduate Student Workshop in Religion & Global Politics Location: Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies, 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208Time: 12:00pm-1:30pm/lunch included Description:The series will bring together seven distinguished scholars with Northwestern faculty, graduate and undergraduate students interested in the interaction of law, religion, culture and politics in social, historical, political and legal contexts. Serving as a forum for reflection on theoretical, methodological, and critical issues in law and society, religion and diversity, and culture and politics in the US and globally, the series will traverse disciplinary boundaries to explore these questions drawing on insights from political science, law, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. The series will complement and contribute to discussions, teaching, and institution building in this field at Northwestern, including the Religion & Global Politics Certificate Program, Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Robert Orsi’s graduate seminar “Religion and Modernity” (Winter 2015), and the Graduate Student Workshop on Religion & Global Politics led by Mona Oraby and Ariel Schwartz. Professor Alessandro Ferrari will be visiting Northwestern in fall 2014 as the Roberta Buffett Visiting Professor of International Studies, and Professor Vanja Savic will be in residence in the fall and winter quarters, also affiliated with BCICS.
January 7, 2015
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
"Love and Liberation: Autobiographical Writings of the Tibetan Buddhist Visionary Sera Khandro"
Book panel presented by Sarah Jacoby, Assistant Professor of Religion, Religious Studies Department Panelists: Paola Zamperini, Chair of Asian Languages and Cultures Department, Associate Professor of Chinese Literature (Northwestern University)Barbara Newman, Professor of English, Religious Studies, & Classics, John Evans Professor of Latin (Northwestern University)Robert Orsi, Professor of Religious Studies, Grace Craddock Nagle Chair in Catholic Studies (Northwestern University)  
November 14, 2014
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
How Theological is Hegel’s Theology?” Hegel’s Lessons for Contemporary Philosophy of Religion
Presented by Nicholas Adams, Senior Lecturer in Theology and Ethics at the University of Edinsburg
November 14, 2014
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Ingvild Torsen: After-life of Phenomenology Research Workshop
Ingvild Torsen (University of Oslo, Department of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and Ideas) presents "Disinterest and truth. On Heidegger's interpretation of Kant's aesthetics" Location: Crowe 1-140 Abstract: Central to Heidegger’s philosophical treatment of art is the characterization of art as a “happening of truth.” This means that an artwork should be understood as an event that opens up a way of being for an audience. Heidegger’s approach to art, with its emphasis on truth, is often portrayed as a rejection of the tradition of modern aesthetics, and especially this tradition’s emphasis on taste and subjectivity. I claim that such a portrait is a caricature and that analyzing Heidegger’s comments on Kant’s aesthetics brings out a much more nuanced picture of what is at stake with the notions of subjectivity and truth in modern aesthetics, both for Heidegger and for us. Unlike his much more substantial work on the first Critique, Heidegger’s take on Kant’s aesthetics has received little attention. Since Heidegger is known in general to dismiss the subjectivist turn in modern philosophy as a confusion with detrimental consequences, one might expect that in the realm of aesthetics, the target of the critique will be Kant, the author of the seminal text of modern aesthetics, which presents an analogous “subjectivist turn.” However, when Heidegger turns to aesthetics and its history in his lectures on Nietzsche and the will to power as art, Kant is not identified as representing such a “subjectivization.” Instead, Heidegger understands Kant and the third Critique’s notion of disinterestedness in particular as a source of insight, offering an interpretation of Kantian disinterestedness as analogous to his own notion of “letting be.”  
November 4, 2014
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Ethnographies of Religion & Politics: Reflections From the Field
This graduate student roundtable features Nurhaizatul Jamil (Anthropology), Gde Metera (Political Science), Mona Oraby (Political Science), and Ariel Schwartz (Religious Studies) whose geographic specialties include Singapore, Indonesia, the United States, and Egypt. They will discuss the types of questions researchers grapple with in the field and as they conceptualize their larger projects. Graduate students and faculty working in these areas and with an interest in the ethnographic study of religion are encouraged to attend. Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to Mona Oraby (moraby@u.northwestern.edu) by Friday, October 31.
November 2, 2014
9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Graduate Conference: "Religion and The Natural Elements"
Through this conference, we aim to cultivate new ways of thinking about religion and the natural world. We focus on religion’s intersections with aspects of nature, from theenvironment, climate, flora, and fauna, to human interactions with the natural, in the form of spirits, gods and goddesses, and miracles. This conference will explore the relationships among ecosystems, religious practice, and religious thought.
November 1, 2014
5:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Graduate Conference: "Religion and The Natural Elements"
Through this conference, we aim to cultivate new ways of thinking about religion and the natural world. We focus on religion’s intersections with aspects of nature, from theenvironment, climate, flora, and fauna, to human interactions with the natural, in the form of spirits, gods and goddesses, and miracles. This conference will explore the relationships among ecosystems, religious practice, and religious thought.
November 1, 2014
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Graduate Conference: "Religion and The Natural Elements"
Through this conference, we aim to cultivate new ways of thinking about religion and the natural world. We focus on religion’s intersections with aspects of nature, from theenvironment, climate, flora, and fauna, to human interactions with the natural, in the form of spirits, gods and goddesses, and miracles. This conference will explore the relationships among ecosystems, religious practice, and religious thought.
October 30, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Religion, Law and Politics Speaker Series - Winnifred Fallers Sullivan
Title: “Spiritual Governance: The Chaplain as Priest of the Secular” Department of Political Science EDGS 2014-15 Speaker Series Organizer: Elizabeth Shakman HurdSponsor: Equality, Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) ProgramCo-sponsors: Department of Political Science, Department of Religious Studies, Graduate Student Workshop in Religion & Global Politics Location: Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies, 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208Time: 12:00pm-1:30pm/lunch included Description:The series will bring together seven distinguished scholars with Northwestern faculty, graduate and undergraduate students interested in the interaction of law, religion, culture and politics in social, historical, political and legal contexts. Serving as a forum for reflection on theoretical, methodological, and critical issues in law and society, religion and diversity, and culture and politics in the US and globally, the series will traverse disciplinary boundaries to explore these questions drawing on insights from political science, law, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. The series will complement and contribute to discussions, teaching, and institution building in this field at Northwestern, including the Religion & Global Politics Certificate Program, Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Robert Orsi’s graduate seminar “Religion and Modernity” (Winter 2015), and the Graduate Student Workshop on Religion & Global Politics led by Mona Oraby and Ariel Schwartz. Professor Alessandro Ferrari will be visiting Northwestern in fall 2014 as the Roberta Buffett Visiting Professor of International Studies, and Professor Vanja Savic will be in residence in the fall and winter quarters, also affiliated with BCICS.
October 16, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Religion, Law and Politics Speaker Series - Alessandro Ferrari
Title: “The Politics of Religious Freedom in the Mediterranean: Between Arab Spring and European Autumn?” Department of Political Science EDGS 2014-15 Speaker Series Organizer: Elizabeth Shakman HurdSponsor: Equality, Development and Globalization Studies (EDGS) ProgramCo-sponsors: Department of Political Science, Department of Religious Studies, Graduate Student Workshop in Religion & Global Politics Location: Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies, 1902 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208Time: 12:00pm-1:30pm/lunch included Description:The series will bring together seven distinguished scholars with Northwestern faculty, graduate and undergraduate students interested in the interaction of law, religion, culture and politics in social, historical, political and legal contexts. Serving as a forum for reflection on theoretical, methodological, and critical issues in law and society, religion and diversity, and culture and politics in the US and globally, the series will traverse disciplinary boundaries to explore these questions drawing on insights from political science, law, religious studies, anthropology, sociology, and history. The series will complement and contribute to discussions, teaching, and institution building in this field at Northwestern, including the Religion & Global Politics Certificate Program, Elizabeth Shakman Hurd and Robert Orsi’s graduate seminar “Religion and Modernity” (Winter 2015), and the Graduate Student Workshop on Religion & Global Politics led by Mona Oraby and Ariel Schwartz. Professor Alessandro Ferrari will be visiting Northwestern in fall 2014 as the Roberta Buffett Visiting Professor of International Studies, and Professor Vanja Savic will be in residence in the fall and winter quarters, also affiliated with BCICS.
October 15, 2014
3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
What Are We up to When We Pray? An Ethnography of a Group of Muslim Women in Iran
Lecture by Niloofar Haeri, Professor and Chair, Department of AnthropologyJohns Hopkins University
May 22, 2014
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Phenomenology Workshop: Julia Ireland - Whitman College
On Thursday May 22nd, Julia Ireland (Philosophy, Whitman College) will present a talk entitled "Naming Physis and the 'Inner Truth of National Socialism': A New Archival Discovery" for the After-life of Phenomenology Workshop. The talk will be held from 4:00-6:00pm in Kresge 2-500 (the German Seminar Room).   Abstract: With the recent publication of Heidegger’s Schwarze Hefte (Black Notebooks), the precise nature of Heidegger’s politics and its relationship to his philosophy is once again under debate. Julia Ireland will present a different way to understand and contextualize that debate in her presentation of Heidegger’s first reference to the “inner truth of National Socialism” in the “Germania” and “The Rhine” lecture course, which predates and provides the interpretive context for Heidegger’s use of this same phrase five months later in Introduction into Metaphysics. What is unusual about Ireland’s approach is its philological reconstruction of Heidegger’s manuscript page, which progresses as a series of insertions that are both a commentary on Heidegger’s interpretation of Nature in Hölderlin and a rejection of Nazi ideology as this specifically concerns what was termed the “new science.” (She will be projecting and working through the manuscript page at her talk.) Ireland’s thesis is that Heidegger understands the “inner truth of National Socialism” as a fu/siv-event. In addition to supplying a paradigm for what a complicated reading of the Schwarze Hefte would entail, Ireland’s analysis includes a fascinating archival story about an editorial error, the cleaning up of Heidegger’s typescript for the “Germania” and “The Rhine” course, and the generation of independent manuscript copies by Heidegger’s most important and unknown war-time lover.
May 17, 2014
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Imagining the Public in Colonial India?
Event is sponsored by Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies (BCICS), Center for Historical Studies, Asian Languages and Cultures, Asian Studies, Critical Theory, English, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies For more information and schedule view our website at http://sites.northwestern.edu/imaginingthepublic/ or contact Professor Ingram at brannon.ingram@northwestern.edu.  
May 16, 2014
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Imagining the Public in Colonial India?
Event is sponsored by Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies (BCICS), Center for Historical Studies, Asian Languages and Cultures, Asian Studies, History, Religious Studies. For more information and schedule view our website at http://sites.northwestern.edu/imaginingthepublic/ or contact Professor Ingram at brannon.ingram@northwestern.edu.
May 13, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
“Critical Caretaking: Reimagining Religion, Nationalism, and Justice from the Israeli Margins”
Atalia Omer, Kroc Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame Atalia Omer is Assistant Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. She earned her Ph.D. from the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University. Her research interests include the theoretical study of the interrelation between religion and nationalism, religion and conflict analysis, and peacebuilding; the role of national / religious / ethnic diasporas in the dynamics of conflict transformation and peace; multiculturalism as a framework for conflict transformation and as a theory of justice; the role of subaltern narratives in reimagining questions of peace and justice; religion and solidarity activism in the diaspora; and the symbolic appropriation of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in other zones of conflict. Her first book When Peace Is Not Enough: How the Israeli Peace Camp Thinks about Religion, Nationalism, and Justice (University of Chicago Press: 2013) examines the way the Israeli peace camp addresses interrelationships among religion, ethnicity, and nationality and how it interprets justice vis-a-vis the Palestinian conflict. Omer is also a co-editor of the Oxford Handbook on Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding (Oxford University Press, forthcoming). This event is made possible through the generous support of the Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies, the Buffett Center's Sams Family Middle East Studies Fund, The Graduate School Catalyst Grant, the Department of Political Science, and the Department of Religious Studies. For more information about the event contact Mona Oraby at monaoraby2015@u.northwestern.edu.
May 7, 2014
3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
“Victor Turner, Anthropology, and Christianity”.
Lecture by Timothy Larsen, McManis Professor of Christian Thought, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois, and the author of The Slain God: Anthropologists and the Christian Faith (Oxford University Press). Event is by invitation only for Religious Studies faculty and graduate students. Reception following.

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